Mueller Report Released to the Public

Mueller Report Released to the Public

At long last… the results we all saw coming.
The Mueller Report officially dropped today — and just as you probably expected, it essentially exonerates President Trump of any wrongdoing.
No proof of collusion.
No proof the President committed any crimes.
The moment the report dropped, we instantly went into action behind the scenes to review it. Our goal is always to bring you timely information about big-ticket news (a category under which the Mueller report certainly falls).
The catch? Good investigative journalism takes time. Although we may have another more exhaustive update for you in the coming days, here’s the most explosive key findings we’re reading about right now.
Remember – it’s all great news!

Key Points

  • Collusion: The Mueller Report states that investigators found no evidence of collusion. Surprising, giving the fact that the Left has been harping about it for nearly two years now.
  • But wait until you hear this: not only did they not find any evidence of collusion, but they also specifically stated that collusion is not even a legal term under United States law. Apparently the Democrats are just making terms up, now.
  • So what did Mueller’s team look for? The correct actionable legal term is “coordination,” and it falls under conspiracy laws. In case you’re wondering, no, Mueller’s team didn’t find proof of that, either.
  • TEST
  • Russian Interference: The Special Counsel also looked into whether Russia interfered with the 2016 election. This was the second “hot ticket” anti-Trump tirade from the Left. While the Special Counsel did find that Russian bad actors attempted to influence the election, they did not find proof that the President had anything to do with it.
  • “The investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government,” the report reads, “in its election interference activities.” Instead, Mueller’s Special Counsel found that Russia’s Internet Research Agency (IRA) was largely to blame.
  • Mueller’s report goes on to say that “no U.S. person,” whether a member of the Trump administration, the GOP, the DNC, or even an everyday citizen, participated in the IRA’s attempts to influence the election. It did, however, clarify that a list of Russian nationals and entities did conspire with the IRA. Those individuals have been charged.
  • The Clinton Emails: The Special Counsel’s investigation also looked at whether Trump or any of his associates conspired to help Russian agents hack computers belonging to the Clinton campaign. It also reviewed the same for other hacking incidents involving several key DNC organizations.
  • TEST
  • Mueller’s team did find proof that Russian agents engaged in covert hacking operations. It then abused the documents in an attempt to influence the election. It’s real, it happened, and it probably wouldn’t have happened if Hillary didn’t have a questionable private email server in the first place.
  • The Special Counsel also found proof that Russia sent hacked documents to WikiLeaks. Once again, it found no proof that Trump or his associates were involved in this process; instead, it again came back to the IRA.
  • Obstruction of Justice: Did the Trump Administration obstruct justice by attempting to exert control over the Special Counsel – or in any other facet of the Russia investigation? Mueller’s team engaged in a “thorough factual investigation” to find answers, and the answer was surprisingly inconclusive.
  • …At least, it was according to the Mueller Report, anyway. “While this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime,” the report reads, “it also does not exonerate him.” Why? They found it “impossible” to conclude that Trump’s actions, or the actions of his administration, amounted to obstruction.
  • TEST
  • A deeper look at the evidence shows that Mueller’s team struggled with “difficult issues” of law and fact. This includes the question of whether obstruction applies or if it is even the correct legal term to use in the first place.
  • Finally, the Special Counsel questioned whether the President could commit obstruction with regard to the investigation if there isn’t any proof he or his people coordinated with Russia and the IRA (he is allowed to have opinions; that doesn’t count).
  • Attorney General William Barr later told the press,“Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and I have concluded that the evidence developed during the Special Counsel’s investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense.”

Be sure to check back with us in the coming days for any updates. This is a developing story, not a final report!