Psychedelic Drug Testing is Back and Look What They Found

Psychedelic Drug Testing is Back and Look What They Found
Psychedelic Drug Testing is Back and Look What They Found

As part of the largest and most rigorous study of psychedelic drugs to date, scientists have recently learned that the infamous Psilocybin (sī-lə-ˈsī-bən) mushroom may have numerous therapeutic applications.
According to an article in Scientific American, researchers at Johns Hopkins University and New York University have found that “a single dose of psilocybin—the psychoactive compound in ‘magic’ mushrooms—substantially diminished depression and anxiety in patients with advanced cancer.”
One patient, who had been suffering from a fear that her ovarian cancer would return, was administered psilocybin. While under the influence of the mushroom, she had a terrifying hallucination that permanently removed her fear. Another cancer patient said it was psilocybin that opened the door for her to a “comforting spiritual journey.”
This research into the therapeutic use of hallucinogens like psilocybin, along with another recent, well-publicized study on the use of MDMA (or “Ecstasy”) to treat victims of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), represents a thawing of sorts on the part of the U.S. government. The United States almost completely eliminated testing of psychedelic drugs on humans back in the early 1970s, when Timothy Leary was the Stephen Hawking of this field. The growing interest in marijuana as medicine, coupled with numerous reports of positive results has also helped drive additional research.
The results of the study show conclusively that subjects with advanced cancer experienced substantially diminished depression and anxiety when treated with the drug. At this point, use of psilocybin has only been studied in populations of individuals with advanced cancer. While it may be therapeutically beneficial to others, it has not yet been tested in other populations.