Senators Try to Take Trump's Military Power

Senators Try to Take Trump's Military Power

Trump’s hardline stance against terrorism and support of the military are both powerful. From the beginning, the POTUS outlined how and when he wouldd respond to countries that act out against the United States. His fierce support and wish for military action in multiple situations plays a role in everything from relations with North Korea to continuing scuffles in the Middle East.
Not everyone sees it the same way.
Senators Rand Paul and Chris Murphy believe Trump maintains too much power over the military. Jeff Flake and Tim Kaine feel he doesn’t have enough. The bipartisan struggle stands to alter Trump’s ability to respond to terror and other military issues throughout the rest of his campaign.
At the heart of the argument, Senators Jeff Flake and Tim Kaine believe Trump needs more power and freedom to enact military action on the Middle East.
The Democratic and Republican senators want to reintroduce a new version of the the Authorization of the Use of Military Force (AUMF) against the Islamic State, a bill first introduced during heightened tensions after September, 2001. Like its predecessor, the new version grants Trump the freedom to use the military in response to terror attacks on home soil or in the Middle East almost without prejudice. It also permits the POTUS to action not only the terrorists themselves, but anyone involved with Islamic terror.
Senators Rand Paul and Chris Murphy, of the Republican and Democratic parties respectively, seek to prevent offensive weapon sales to Saudi Arabia instead. Just a short time ago, Trump unveiled a plan to generate $110 billion in income for America by selling small offensive weapons to the Middle Eastern country.
Many experts believe those weapons would wind up in the wrong hands, but Saudi leaders deny this.
This isn’t the first time the four Senators have crossed wires over the POTUS’ control over the military. A similar effort saw both Kane and Flake fighting for a debate over the Authorization to Use Military Force President Obama himself when attempting to sort out issues in Syria. Both Senators believed, at least at the time, that the AUMF order would give the POTUS far too much power and control.
Just under a year ago, Senator Rand Paul attempted to halt the sales of weapons to Syria. His efforts resulted in a vote that affected Obama’s final few months in office.
All four Senators are likely influenced by Trump’s swift and instant reaction to chemical attacks in northern Syria just a few short weeks ago. The POTUS drafted an order for immediate air strikes to a local air base in Idlib, a small base just north of the rebel-held town Khan Sheikhoun in Syria, after the attack. Political experts praised Trump for the move, but local U.S. lawmakers warned against further escalations. Most believe that the POTUS (regardless of who is at the helm) should be required to seek Congressional approval before responding with military action.