U.S. to Take Military Action Against North Korea

U.S. to Take Military Action Against North Korea

The President isn’t backing down from North Korea’s refusal to stop nuclear testing immediately. New information released on Monday revealed that the United States is prepared to move forward with more advanced attempts to silence the nation no matter what it takes. National Security Adviser Lt. General H.R. McMaster agrees; he says that America must be prepared for the eventuality of a fight with the tiny northern peninsula. The security specialist also called out North Korea explicitly, saying that they were, in “open defiance of the international community.”
McMaster seems frustrated with the lack of action from other countries like China and South Korea. He pointed out that the President would prefer that many of these countries step in and assist America with the attempt to disarm the tiny country, but also made the concession that America is prepared to step in even if that desire doesn’t come to fruition. He also admitted that he would rather see a resolution to the issue of North Korea without military action — something that just isn’t likely to happen given the reclusive Kim Jong Il’s steadfast refusal to back down.
“North Korea poses a grave threat to the United States, our great allies in the region, South Korea and Japan… but also to China and others. And so it’s important, I think, for all of us to confront this regime,” McMaster said in an interview with Fox News, highlighting his belief that North Korea stands to harm much of the developed world.
While McMaster shied away from explaining exactly what military action might look like, he highlighted other ways in which the United States might pressure North Korea into action. Further sanctions were one of the bargaining chips on the table, stifling an already-struggling North Korea, which is already operating under extreme poverty.
U.N. sanctions could effectively prevent aid and trade from reaching the country, and would significantly hamper North Korea’s access to weapons, military equipment and technology.
Both the President himself and McMaster have been hesitant to explain their plans for North Korea, with President Trump likening the back and forth to a “chess game.” He asserted that he did have a plan, but didn’t want to reveal it for North Korea to access.
North Korea continues to fire off ballistic missiles, most of which have failed to launch successfully in the previous weeks. Despite the fact that the missiles were duds, they still go against previous international sanctions that state any missile coming out of North Korea is illegal. Both the American government and the U.N. believe that the only reason the country is making missile tests is to experiment until they create a weapon capable of reaching American shores.